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String of own goals by Russian spies exposes a strange sloppiness

mikenova shared this story from Novichok poisonings | The Guardian.

The secretive, daring GRU seems to have lost its way in the age of internet search

It must go down as one of the most embarrassing months ever for Russia’s military intelligence.

In the 30 days since Theresa May revealed the cover identities of the Salisbury poison suspects, the secretive GRU (now GU) has been publicly exposed by rival intelligence agencies and online sleuths, with an assist from Russia’s own president.

Related: Visual guide: how Dutch intelligence thwarted a Russian hacking operation

Continue reading…

Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search

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String of own goals by Russian spies exposes a strange sloppiness | World news
String of own goals by Russian spies exposes a strange sloppiness
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Putin compares Khashoggi case to Skripal poisoning, asks why Russia condemned despite lack of proof — RT World News
Novichok poisonings | The Guardian – Google Search
Novichok poisonings | The Guardian – Google Search
Novichok poisonings: what is the GRU and how does it operate? | World news
Inside Europe: Skripal and the Czech connection | Media Center | DW
“Hanging Johnny” in BILLY BUDD (1962) – YouTube
Лондон ответил отказом на запрос СКР по делу Скрипалей
The Latest: Britain says Russia has 24 theories on poisoning – Washington Times
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search

 

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String of own goals by Russian spies exposes a strange sloppiness | World news
 

mikenova shared this story from The Guardian.

It must go down as one of the most embarrassing months ever for Russia’s military intelligence.

In the 30 days since Theresa May revealed the cover identities of the Salisbury poison suspects, the secretive GRU (now GU) has been publicly exposed by rival intelligence agencies and online sleuths, with an assist from Russia’s own president.

Despite attempts to stonewall public inquiry, the GRU’s dissection has been clinical. The agency has always had a reputation for daring, bolstered by its affiliation with special forces commando units and agents who have seen live combat.

But in dispatching agents to the Netherlands who could, just using Google, be easily exposed as graduates of an elite GRU academy, the agency appears reckless and absurdly sloppy.

One of the suspected agents, tipped as a “human intelligence source” by Dutch investigators, had registered five vehicles at a north-western Moscow address better known as the Aquarium, the GRU finishing school for military attaches and elite spies. According to online listings, which are not official but are publicly available to anyone on Google, he drove a Honda Civic, then moved on to an Alfa Romeo. In case the address did not tip investigators off, he also listed the base number of the Military-Diplomatic Academy.

That was the same school where Anatoliy Chepiga, the alleged true identity of the Russian suspect in the Salisbury poisoning, finished his education. Viktor Suvorov, a GRU agent who later defected to the west, described the academy as so secret that Soviet citizens could be jailed just for revealing its existence.

The internet has now made it far harder to hide that evidence. But the GRU apparently thought that would not matter.

Meanwhile, most of the alleged agents could be found online.

One of the men, Aleksei Morenets, an alleged hacker, appeared to have set up a dating profile.

Another played for an amateur Moscow football team “known as the security services team” a current player told the Moscow Times. “Almost everyone works for an intelligence agency.” The team rosters are publicly available.

Russia has claimed that the investigations are fake and that researchers are in league with western intelligence. But most of the evidence to uncover the spies was already out there, and conveniently timestamped on social media.

The saga began after May’s announcement last month, when Vladimir Putin ordered the two Salisbury suspects to appear on television. There, the two men fumbled through an awkward story about visiting Salisbury twice to see the cathedral, while an editor for state television suggested that they were gay. Homosexuality is largely treated as taboo in Russia and the government passed a law banning “gay propaganda” in 2013.

It didn’t help. One of the two men was outed as a likely GRU colonel anyway, after online investigators dug up photographs from his military service and leaked passport records.

Along the way, the researchers from Bellingcat and the Insider also recognised that the men were issued sequentially numbered passports by a special division, making it easier for anyone with access to a leaked database to identify them.

And then came Thursday’s bombshell: four men outed by Dutch investigators for attempting to hack into the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (as well as Malaysia’s investigation into a downed jetliner).

The alleged spies were caught carrying enough telephones to fill an electronics store. Moreover, like all meticulous Russians on a business trip, they held on to their taxi receipts from GRU headquarters.

Russia will publicly deny the latest reports and revelations about the alleged GRU agents. It has no other alternative. But the exposure of several consecutive European operations should raise questions about whether Russian military intelligence is being intentionally provocative or has simply gone off the rails.

String of own goals by Russian spies exposes a strange sloppiness
 

mikenova shared this story from Novichok poisonings | The Guardian.

The secretive, daring GRU seems to have lost its way in the age of internet search

It must go down as one of the most embarrassing months ever for Russia’s military intelligence.

In the 30 days since Theresa May revealed the cover identities of the Salisbury poison suspects, the secretive GRU (now GU) has been publicly exposed by rival intelligence agencies and online sleuths, with an assist from Russia’s own president.

Related: Visual guide: how Dutch intelligence thwarted a Russian hacking operation

Continue reading…

Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
 

mikenova shared this story .

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Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from UrduPoint News

Italy To Back Anti-Russia Sanctions If Moscow Proved Guilty In Skripal …

UrduPoint News14 hours ago
… involvement in the March 4 poisoning of ex-spy Sergei Skripal in the UK city of Salisbury, … The RussianForeign Ministry has sent some 60 diplomatic notes to the UK … Russian citizenship, as well as proposing legal assistance and cooperation. … and London’s refusal to provide consular access to the poisoning victims.

Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from The Sun

The Sun

UK is trying to keep EU on a short leash despite Brexit – Lavrov

Tremont HeraldOct 17, 2018
UK is trying to keep EU on a short leash despite Brexit – Lavrov … After groundlessly blaming Russia of the chemical poisoning of former … his daughter Yulia in Salisbury in March, “the British persuaded not everybody, … Lavrov reiterated that Russia has addressed the UK on numerous occasions, offering cooperation in …

Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from Sputnik International

UK Aims to Gather Multiple Anti-Russia Voices, Mocks Legal System …

Sputnik InternationalOct 16, 2018
The Council of the European Union has adopted new sanctions to counter the use of chemical weapons. “The EU will now be able to impose sanctions on …

Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from UrduPoint News

Russian Embassy Reveals Why Moscow Believes Bellingcat Linked …

UrduPoint NewsOct 15, 2018
Moscow believes that the UK-based website Bellingcat is linked to … The embassy stressed that London’s allegations of Russia having had a role in the Salisbury poisoning … “Why has the United Kingdom refused to transfer any samples of the … lack of evidence, while London had been rejecting any offer for cooperation.
Putin compares Khashoggi case to Skripal poisoning, asks why Russia condemned despite lack of proof — RT World News
 

mikenova shared this story from RT – Daily news.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has contrasted the world’s response to the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi with its response to the poisoning of ex-Russian spy Sergei Skripal, citing lack of proof in both cases.

Speaking at the annual Valdai Discussion Club in Sochi, Putin said that despite a lack of evidence proving Russian involvement in the poisoning of Skripal and his daughter Yulia in March, punitive actions were immediately taken against Moscow. In contrast, he said, that did not happen with Riyadh following Khashoggi’s disappearance.

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© Reuters / Jonathan Ernst

“There’s no proof in regards to Russia, but steps are taken. Here, people say that a murder happened in Istanbul, but no steps are taken. People need to figure out a single approach to these kinds of problems,” Putin said.

Khashoggi, a journalist who wrote columns that were critical of the Saudi kingdom for the Washington Post, disappeared on October 2 when he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to obtain documents for his planned marriage to a Turkish citizen.

Despite Turkish authorities pinning the blame for Khashoggi’s alleged murder on Riyadh – claiming to have video and audio proof to back it up – the US has been reluctant to point the finger at the Saudis. US President Donald Trump even floated the theory that perhaps “rogue killers” were responsible for the journalist’s disappearance. No such alternative explanations were offered following the Skripals’ poisoning.

Asked whether Moscow would respond to the Khashoggi disappearance, Putin said Russia still did not have enough details to take any action. “Why do we need to take some steps towards the deterioration of our relations if we don’t understand what is happening? But if someone understands and someone believes that the murder occurred, then I hope that some evidence will be provided,” he said.

Trump has been accused by numerous analysts, journalists and politicians of advocating for Riyadh in order to protect the US’ financially beneficial relationship with the Gulf nation. Many have cited Trump’s business ties with Saudis dating back decades.

On the day that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo landed in Riyadh to discuss the Khashoggi case, $100 million was transferred to the State Department by Saudi Arabia – part of a long-planned contribution to help stabilize newly liberated regions of Syria. The US, however, denied that the timing of the transfer had anything to do with the diplomatic incident over Khashoggi’s disappearance.

Turkish sources have leaked information to the press, including details from an alleged recording made of Khashoggi’s murder, during which Saudi forensics expert Saleh al-Tubaiqi allegedly dismemberedthe journalist’s body while his colleagues listened to music.

Saudi Arabia has denied claims of involvement. Trump has cast doubt over the existence of the tape, and said he plans to have a discussion with Pompeo following his fact-finding trip to Riyadh and Istanbul earlier this week.

READ MORE: ‘Sawed while still alive’? Gruesome ‘taped’ details of Khashoggi’s alleged murder cause media stir

When the Skripals were poisoned in the English town of Salisbury in March, British intelligence agencies swiftly accused the Kremlin of being responsible and sanctions were slapped on Moscow. British Prime Minister Theresa May led a chorus of international condemnation, expelling 23 Russian diplomats from the country and convincing the US and a slew of European countries to follow suit.

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Story image for Novichok poisonings | The Guardian from The Guardian

Salisbury house prices fall by nearly 10% after novichok attack

The GuardianOct 15, 2018
House prices in Salisbury have dived by nearly a 10% since the novichok poisonings, according to analysis of Land Registry data. The average …

Story image for Novichok poisonings | The Guardian from The Guardian

Consultants brought in to ‘rebrand’ Salisbury after novichok attack

The GuardianSep 28, 2018
A team of consultants has been brought in to try to “rebrand” Salisbury as it attempts to recover from the novichok poisonings. The consultants …

Story image for Novichok poisonings | The Guardian from The Guardian

‘We got really lucky’: how novichok suspects’ identities were revealed

The GuardianSep 27, 2018
The odds of finding the Salisbury novichok poisoning suspects’ real … pioneering a series of open-source investigations, told the Guardian.

Story image for Novichok poisonings | The Guardian from The Guardian

The Skripal Files by Mark Urban review – the Salisbury spy’s story

The GuardianOct 17, 2018
… Skripal this March with a show-off kind of murder weapon: novichok. … Skripal woke up in Salisbury hospital, five weeks after his poisoning, …

Story image for Novichok poisonings | The Guardian from The Guardian

Police question couple at centre of Salisbury poisoning scare

The GuardianSep 20, 2018
A major incident was declared and the pair were tested for exposure to novichok, but medics quickly established they had not been the victims …
Was Prezzo Salisbury poisoning a hoax?
InternationalThe Week UKSep 20, 2018

Story image for Novichok poisonings | The Guardian from The Guardian

How a college drop out became a champion of investigative journalism

The GuardianSep 30, 2018
… to exposing the identity of one of the novichok poisoning suspects … in connection with the poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter …

Story image for Novichok poisonings | The Guardian from The Guardian

Vladimir Putin calls Sergei Skripal a scumbag and a traitor

The GuardianOct 3, 2018
Speaking at an energy forum in Moscow, the Russian president accused the west of portraying Skripal, who was poisoned with novichok in …
“The Skripal Files” book released this week
112 International (blog)Oct 2, 2018

Novichok poisonings: what is the GRU and how does it operate? | World news
 

mikenova shared this story from The Guardian.

Theresa May’s statement saying the UK believes the Russian military intelligence service was behind the Salisbury novichok poisoning shines a further unwelcome spotlight on the most secretive of all the country’s intelligence agencies.

A slow drip of information about operations by the Russian service, known as the GRU, in recent years – from hacking ahead of the US election to support for the Kremlin’s wars in Ukraine and Syria – has shown the wide reach of the agency.

The intelligence wing of the Russian military was renamed the GU in 2010, but both inside and outside the country it is still more commonly known by its old name, the GRU.

The agency, where Sergei Skripal, who was poisoned by the nerve agent novichok, used to work, performs traditional military intelligence tasks and foreign intelligence operations.

For decades Soviet military intelligence kept up a parallel global network of agents and deep-cover “illegals” operating overseas with that run by the KGB. The most famous of the agents was Richard Sorge, who posed as a Nazi journalist in Japan in the 1930s and sent valuable intelligence to Moscow, including details of Adolf Hitler’s plans to attack the Soviet Union, which were ignored by Joseph Stalin.

When the Soviet Union collapsed and the KGB’s foreign spying operations were shifted to a new network, the SVR, the GRU retained a separate status. Although the SVR and GRU often have overlapping interests they tend to work in competition, with separate “residencies” inside Russian foreign missions abroad.

Sergei Tretyakov, who was a high-ranking officer in the SVR’s New York residency until he defected in 2000, explained in a book that there was no overlap between the work of the two agencies. There were two unmarked steel doors on the eighth floor of Russia’s UN mission in New York, said Tretyakov, one of which led to the SVR and one to the GRU. Neither agency had access to the office of the other. The head of the GRU reports to the defence minister and to Vladimir Putin, the Russian president.

The GRU has been identified as the main culprit in hacking ahead of the 2016 US election. A recent indictment from the team of special investigator Robert Mueller named 12 apparent GRU officers over the alleged hacking and leaking of Democratic party emails. Like the US operation, the novichok poisoning fits an apparent pattern of GRU operations: ingenious and audacious, yet uncovered and publicised by the target countries.

The open source investigative team Bellingcat recently claimed it had identified a GRU officer named Oleg Ivannikov as being partly responsible for the downing of Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 over eastern Ukraine in 2014. The officer had also, allegedly, operated under a pseudonym as the defence minister of the Kremlin-backed breakaway state of South Ossetia. Again, it was an operation that mixed impressive tradecraft with errors: among the clues to the man’s identity was a record of an online shopping delivery where he had given his address as GRU headquarters.

Inside Europe: Skripal and the Czech connection | Media Center | DW
 

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MEDIA CENTER

A new twist has emerged in the attempted poisoning of former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. Czech Radio has reported that the two suspects, believed to be Russian military intelligence officers, were in the Czech Republic in October 2014, the same time that Skripal was allegedly briefing Czech intelligence on Russian spying activity. Rob Cameron reports from Prague.

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“Hanging Johnny” in BILLY BUDD (1962) – YouTube
 

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“Hanging Johnny” in BILLY BUDD (1962)

Лондон ответил отказом на запрос СКР по делу Скрипалей
 

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В четверг, 18 октября, стало известно, что Великобритания ответила отказом на запрос Следственного комитета России (СКР) о взаимной помощи в расследовании «дела Скрипалей».

Как уточнил министр иностранных дел РФ Сергей Лавров, долгое время Лондон вообще никак не реагировал на запрос, ответ пришел лишь «несколько дней назад». Причем свой отказ британские правоохранители обосновали «соображениями национальной безопасности».

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«Несколько дней назад поступил ответ, в котором официально написано, что по соображениям национальной безопасности Великобритания не может предоставить нам помощь по данному конкретному уголовному делу, связанному с судьбой граждан Российской Федерации», – сказал Лавров в интервью французским СМИ – RT France, Paris Match и Figaro.

Также глава МИД РФ отметил, что все международные конвенции требуют от Лондона предоставить Москве доступ ко всем фактам, связанным с расследованием инцидента в Солсбери, так как одной из пострадавших является Юлия Скрипаль – российская гражданка.

Напомним, как сообщал сайт kp.ru, в начале марта британский шпион Сергей Скрипаль и его дочь Юлия были отравлены в городе Солсбери. По словам местных властей, они подверглись воздействию некоего нервно-паралитического вещества.

А вскоре в Лондоне заявили, что к инциденту якобы причастна Москва, однако никаких доказательств не представили. Кроме того, британская сторона сразу отказалась идти на контакт с Москвой в связи с делом Скрипалей.

The Latest: Britain says Russia has 24 theories on poisoning – Washington Times
 

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The Latest: Britain says Russia has 24 theories on poisoning

– Associated Press – Thursday, April 5, 2018

MOSCOW (AP) – The Latest on the poisoning of a Russian ex-spy and his daughter (all times local):

12:00 a.m.

Britain’s U.N. ambassador says Russia has come up with 24 theories on who bears responsibility for the poisoning of an ex-spy and his daughter in England, but the United Kingdom has only one – that it’s highly likely Russia was responsible.

Karen Pierce told a U.N. Security Council meeting called by Russia on Thursday: “We believe that the U.K.’s actions stand up to any scrutiny. … We have nothing to hide, but I do fear that Russia might have something to fear.”

Pierce strongly criticized Russia for insisting on having its own experts participate in the examination of the nerve agent used in the attack on Sergei and Yulia Skripal. Samples of what is believed to have sickened them are being analyzed by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

Pierce also told reporters later that she finds it “grotesque” that Russia is blocking the investigation into responsibility for chemical weapons use in Syria while demanding that it be part of the investigation into the March 4 poisonings of the Skripals in the city of Salisbury.

___

11:25 p.m.

Russia’s U.N. ambassador says Moscow assumes “with a high degree of probability” that the intelligence services of other countries are behind the likely the poisoning of a former Russian spy and his daughter in Britain.

Vassily Nebenzia told the U.N. Security Council at a Thursday meeting called by Russia that “everything confirms this is a coordinated, very well-planned campaign” intended “to discredit and even delegitimize Russia.”

He did not name the intelligence services that Russia suspects, but said their goal is to accuse Moscow of using “a horrible, inhumane weapon, of concealing the arsenal of this substance,” of violating the Chemical Weapons Convention, and putting in question Russia’s “role not only in finding a solution in Syria, but anywhere else.”

Nebenzia said Britain is required to allow Russia to participate in the investigation of the March 4 attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia.

He also questioned the British government’s claims of Russian responsibility by asking what antidotes for exposure to the Novichok nerve agent the Skripals were given and where they were for four hours without cellphones on the day of the attack.

___

11:00 p.m.

Russia’s ambassador to the United Nations has given a blistering indictment of the British government’s allegations that Moscow was behind the nerve-agent poisoning in England of an ex-spy and his daughter.

U.N. Ambassador Vassily Nebenzia opened a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Thursday with a lengthy statement in which he claimed that Russia was the victim of a hasty, sloppy and ill-intentioned defamation campaign by Britain and its allies.

Nebenzia said: “Great Britain refuses to cooperate with us on the pretext that the victim does not cooperate with the criminal….A crime was committed on British territory, possibly a terrorist act, and it is our citizens who are the victims.”

Russia called the Security Council session at U.N. headquarters in New York to appeal to other nations for support in pursuing another explanation for the March 4 attack on Sergei Skripal, a former Russian military intelligence agent who was convicted of spying for Britain.

Nebenzia challenged Britain to take his statement as “a litmus test” of the country’s integrity and respect for international norms.

___

This item has been corrected to show the current U.N. ambassador from Russia is Vassily Nebenzia, not Vitaly Churkin.

___

9:15 p.m.

Britain’s ambassador to the United Nations says she fears Russia called a meeting of the U.N. Security Council to discuss the poisoning of an ex-spy in England to show “contempt” for international institutions such as the U.N.

Ambassador Karen Pierce said she also has “a bit of a fear” that Moscow is trying “to build a narrative” for why it won’t accept the forthcoming findings from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons on the nerve agent that sickened Sergei Skripal and his daughter.

Piece told reporters ahead of Thursday afternoon’s Security Council meeting that Britain looks forward to the chemical weapons watchdog’s report and has “nothing to hide.”

She said: “We ask, what have the Russians got to fear?”

Pierce said a number of factors led the British government to conclude that “this was a Russian state attack.” She says they include a Russian declaration that its ex-agents are fair game, knowledge that Russia has made military-grade nerve agents and “other information that I am not able to disclose.”

___

7:50 p.m.

Russia’s Ambassador to Britain, Alexander Yakovenko, has rejected the notion that the embassy is “trolling” Britain with its Twitter account.

The London Embassy’s account, which has sometimes mirrored the wry humor of the ambassador, has been vocal in demanding evidence backing Britain’s insistence that Russia was behind the March 4 nerve agent attack on former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in the city of Salisbury.

One March post featured a picture of actor David Suchet as Hercule Poirot, the intrepid sleuth of Agatha Christie novels.

On March 18 the Russian Embassy tweeted: “In absence of evidence, we definitely need Poirot in Salisbury!”

Pressed on the tweets, Yakovenko said Thursday that “We are using in this situation a sense of human humor because some statements are really not friendly.”

___

4:30 p.m.

Russia’s top diplomat says Moscow must participate in a probe into the poisoning of an ex-Russian spy in Britain and see evidence if it is to accept the probe’s results.

Britain blamed Russia for the March 4 poisoning of former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter, accusations Russia has denied.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Britain stonewalled Moscow’s request for evidence and refused to let Russia join the probe.

Asked Thursday if Russia would accept the conclusions of the international chemical weapons watchdog, Lavrov said Moscow can’t give an advance approval to a verdict coming after a secret investigation to which it had no access.

Lavrov said that the expulsions of over 150 Russian diplomats by two dozen Western nations threatened global stability. Moscow expelled the same number of Western diplomats.

___

4:15 p.m.

The poisoned daughter of Russian ex-spy Sergei Skripal says in a statement released by police that her strength is growing daily and that she is grateful for the interest shown in her case.

Yulia Skripal said Thursday that she woke up over a week ago after being poisoned along with her father in the southwestern city of Salisbury on March 4. The 33-year-old expressed gratitude to the people who came to their aid.

She says that “I am sure you appreciate that the entire episode is somewhat disorientating, and I hope that you’ll respect my privacy and that of my family during the period of my convalescence.”

Britain has blamed Russia for the poisoning using a military grade nerve agent. In response, more than two dozen Western allies including Britain, the U.S. and NATO have ordered out over 150 Russian diplomats in a show of solidarity.

___

3:45 p.m.

Russian state television has released a recording of what it says is a phone call between the daughter of an ex-spy poisoned in Britain and her cousin in Russia.

In it, Yulia Skripal says she and her father, former double agent Sergei Skripal, are both recovering and in normal health. She says her father is sleeping and his health has not been irreparably damaged.

Rossiya TV says Skripal’s niece, Viktoria, who lives in Moscow, provided it with the recording of her conversation with Yulia. The broadcaster says it can’t verify the recording’s authenticity.

Britain has blamed Russia for the March 4 nerve agent attack that sickened the Skripals. The British hospital treating them said Yulia’s condition has improved, while her father has remained in critical condition. Russia has vehemently denied involvement in the poisoning.

___

11 a.m.

Russia’s top diplomat has dismissed the recent expulsions of Russian diplomats as a mockery of international law.

Two dozen countries have kicked out a total of more than 150 Russian diplomats in a show of solidarity with Britain, which blames Russia for last month’s poisoning of a former Russian spy in Britain.

Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Thursday the nerve agent poisoning of Sergei Skripal was “staged” to justify the expulsions from many countries “whose arms were twisted.”

The international chemical weapons watchdog on Wednesday rejected Russia’s calls for a joint investigation with Britain. Russia said the number of countries that abstained from the vote suggested many have doubts about Britain’s allegations that Moscow was behind the attack.

Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC.

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Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
 

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Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
 

mikenova shared this story .

Image result for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning

Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
 

mikenova shared this story .

Image result for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning

Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
 

mikenova shared this story .

Image result for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning

Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google Search
 

mikenova shared this story from Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning – Google News.

Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from Anadolu Agency

Russia rejects claim on IDs of Salisbury suspects

Anadolu AgencyOct 12, 2018
Yakovenko also said relations between the UK and Russia are “very low”, accusing the Britishgovernment of not cooperating with Russia in … Yakovenko also denied any Russian involvement in the Salisbury poisoning or …
LIVE: Russian ambassador: UK relations at very low level
InternationalSky NewsOct 12, 2018

Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from FRANCE 24

Russia’s Putin calls poisoned ex-spy Skripal a ‘scumbag’ and ‘traitor’

FRANCE 24Oct 3, 2018
But he again denied any Russian involvement in the poisoning of Skripal, … and his daughter Yulia with Novichok in the English city of Salisbury in March. … Putin said Britain should go through proper channels to cooperate …

Media image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from Express.co.uk

Express.co.uk

Media image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from Reuters

Reuters

Media image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from Sputnik International

Sputnik International

Media image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from U.S. News & World Report

U.S. News & World Report

Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from Sputnik International

Sputnik International

Russian embassy: British government seeks Moscow’s isolation on …

TASSSep 28, 2018
… “the British authorities have categorically refused to cooperate with Russia, … Toxicity of the poison used in Salisbury is also impossible to verify.” … incident through the media, while refusing to officially engage with Russia.

Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from Voice of America

Widow of Poisoned Spy: UK Has Upped Response to Would-Be …

Voice of AmericaSep 19, 2018
Speaking with VOA’s Russian service, Marina Litvinenko, … As Britain launched a formal probe of the Salisbury chemical attack, which experts traced to a Soviet-era nerve toxin known as Novichok, Russia, she said, refused to discuss … And I think Russian intelligence emphasized [Alexander’s] cooperation …

Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from RT

UK is trying to keep EU on a short leash despite Brexit – Lavrov

RTOct 16, 2018
After groundlessly blaming Russia of the chemical poisoning of former … Yulia in Salisbury in March, “the British persuaded not everybody, … UK on numerous occasions, offering cooperation in the Skripal case on … A relative of Yulia Skripal, who wanted to visit her in the UK, has been denied a British visa.

Story image for Britain refused cooperation with Russia on Salisbury poisoning from RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty

Russian Novichok Suspects Shadowed Skripal In Prague, Report Says

RadioFreeEurope/RadioLibertyOct 10, 2018
The two Russian men suspected by British intelligence of poisoning … the English city of Salisbury on March 4, the day the former Russian … The Russian Embassy in Prague declined to comment on whether … Russian spy “continued cooperating with some secret services” after he went West in the swap.

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