5:23 PM 8/14/2018 – M.N.: The Reluctant Prophet Jonah as one of the early Hermeneutic Interpreters: Searching for the understanding and interpretation is being inside of the whale. Finding it is getting out of the whale. If the Higher Authorities want you to interpret and to prophesy, you cannot escape, not even in the belly of a whale. 

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M.N.: The Reluctant Prophet Jonah as one of the early Hermeneutic Interpreters: Searching for the understanding and interpretation is being inside of the whale. Finding it is getting out of the whale. If the Higher Authorities want you to interpret and to prophesy, you cannot escape, not even in the belly of a whale. 

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jonah and the whale – Google Search
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August 14, 2018
bridges collapse – Google Search
Buck Sexton: Another one bites the dust at the FBI
TCHAIKOVSKY – Symphony no6 (Pathetique) – Herbert von Karajan & Wiener Phil – YouTube
Karajan Plays Mozart – YouTube
Manafort Lawyers Rest Without Calling Witnesses in Fraud Trial
Trump unloads on FBI, Robert Mueller, Jeff Sessions, Peter Strzok

 

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Jonah – Wikipedia
 

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Jonah or Jonas[a] is the name given in the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh/Old Testament) to a prophet of the northern kingdom of Israel in about the 8th century BCE. He is the eponymous central figure of the Book of Jonah, in which he is called upon by God to travel to Nineveh and warn its residents to repent of their sins or face divine wrath. Instead, Jonah boards a ship to Tarshish. Caught in a storm, he orders the ship’s crew to cast him overboard, whereupon he is swallowed by a giant fish. Three days later, after Jonah agrees to go to Nineveh, the fish vomits him out onto the shore. Jonah successfully convinces the entire city of Nineveh to repent, but waits outside the city in expectation of its destruction. God shields Jonah from the sun with a plant, but later sends a worm to cause it to wither. When Jonah complains of the bitter heat, God rebukes him.

In Judaism, the story of Jonah represents the teaching of teshuva, which is the ability to repent and be forgiven by God. In the New TestamentJesus calls himself “greater than Jonah” and promises the Pharisees “the sign of Jonah”, which is his resurrection. Early Christian interpreters viewed Jonah as a type for Jesus. Later, during the Reformation, Jonah came to be seen instead as an archetype for the “envious Jew”. Jonah is regarded as a prophet in Islam and the biblical narrative of Jonah is repeated, with a few notable differences, in the Quran. Mainstream Bible scholars generally regard the Book of Jonah as fictional and often at least partially satirical, but the character of Jonah may have been based on the historical prophet of the same name mentioned in 2 Kings 14:25.

Although the word “whale” is often used in English versions of the Jonah story, the Hebrew text actually uses the phrase dag gadol, which means “giant fish”. In the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, the species of the fish that swallowed Jonah was the subject of speculation for naturalists, who interpreted the story as an account of a historical incident. Some modern scholars of folklore have noted similarities between Jonah and other legendary figures, such as Gilgamesh and the Greek hero Jason.

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August 14, 2018
 

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Buck Sexton: Another one bites the dust at the FBI
 

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TheHill.com

Buck Sexton: Another one bites the dust at the FBI

What Fusion GPS told DOJ about Trump

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Next Up: What Fusion GPS told DOJ about Trump

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What Fusion GPS told DOJ about Trump

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Jamal Simmons: Some black politicians worry Southern GOP is trying to wipe out white Democrats through redistricting

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Carl Cannon: Most political analysts let their dislike of Trump blind them from the possibility he could win

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Buck Wild: If ex-intel officials want to act like partisans, they shouldn’t be surprised that Trump treats them like partisans

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The Hill’s Jonathan Turley: Dems from swing states face even more pressure to support SCOTUS nomination

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Elaine Plott: moderates sparked movement behind GOP immigration bills

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Jamal Simmons: ‘Stand your ground’ cases feel like ‘a one-man lynch mob’

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Krystal Ball responds to Charlie Kirk: ‘It’s a bit much’ to tie Antifa to Dems

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TCHAIKOVSKY – Symphony no6 (Pathetique) – Herbert von Karajan & Wiener Phil – YouTube
 

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TCHAIKOVSKY – Symphony no6 (Pathetique) – Herbert von Karajan & Wiener Phil

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Manafort Lawyers Rest Without Calling Witnesses in Fraud Trial
 

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ALEXANDRIA, Va. — Lawyers for Paul Manafort rested without calling witnesses on Tuesday in their client’s trial on bank and fraud charges, a stark contrast from the prosecution’s case that included testimony from nearly two dozen people and hundreds of documents entered into evidence.

Before they rested, the judge, T.S. Ellis III, denied a motion to acquit Mr. Manafort. Judge Ellis scheduled closing arguments to begin on Wednesday morning.

Prosecutors for the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, had rested on Monday after mounting what appeared to be a powerful case that Mr. Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign chairman, had evaded taxes on roughly $16.5 million in income and fraudulently obtained more than $21 million in bank loans.

The core of the government’s case rested on more than two days of testimony by Rick Gates, Mr. Manafort’s onetime trusted aide, who has pleaded guilty to two felony charges and is hoping his cooperation will keep him out of prison. Mr. Gates recounted helping Mr. Manafort hide his income in foreign bank accounts and trick banks into extending him loans that he was not qualified to receive.

Mr. Manafort’s lawyers had assailed Mr. Gates as a liar, adulterer and thief who had committed all of the crimes that Mr. Manafort was accused of, and more. On the stand, Mr. Gates admitted to a host of offenses, including stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from Mr. Manafort’s bank accounts and concealing $3 million of his own income from tax authorities. While he appeared confident when prosecutors questioned him about Mr. Manafort’s criminal activity, he grew less sure when defense lawyers confronted him with questions about his own misdeeds.

Asked about how he embezzled funds by filing false expense reports, for example, Mr. Gates replied at one point: “It wasn’t a scheme. I just added numbers to the reports.”

The trial, the first for Mr. Mueller’s office, did not relate to the Trump campaign or Russia’s campaign of interference in 2016 presidential election, but Judge Ellis had ruled that Mr. Mueller’s mandate was broad enough for him to pursue the case.

While it was not a focus, references to the Trump campaign emerged intermittently during the trial. Mr. Gates testified that Mr. Manafort’s political consulting firm, for which he worked for years, had no clients or income at the time the Trump campaign hired the two men in March 2016. Mr. Manafort managed delegates to the national convention, rose to campaign chairman in two months, then was forced out in late August amid allegations that he had failed to report his work for oligarchs in Ukraine who were allied with Russia.

Mr. Gates, who stayed with the campaign through the election, testified that “it was possible” that he stole money then from the Trump inaugural committee while serving as its executive director.

Defense attorneys attempted to question him about the special counsel’s interest in the campaign, perhaps in the hopes that jurors would see the Manafort prosecution as part of a politically inspired effort to gather evidence against the president. Mr. Trump routinely condemns Mr. Mueller’s investigation as a “witch hunt.”

But they dropped that line of questioning after the prosecutors objected and the judge apparently ruled it was out of bounds. He sealed the transcript of the discussion of the issue at the bench after prosecutors argued that they needed to protect an ongoing investigation.

The defense’s decision to rest without presenting its own case is relatively common, experts said, given that the burden of proof is on the prosecution.

“The defense believes it has made its point through cross-examination that the government’s proof is not judicial,” said Nancy Gertner, a Harvard Law School professor and a former federal judge. “They’re relying on the jury to agree with them.”

Emily Baumgaertner and Emily Cochrane contributed reporting.

Trump unloads on FBI, Robert Mueller, Jeff Sessions, Peter Strzok
 

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